1. Text alternatives for decorative images

    Written by on December 18, 2013 in Design, Development

    In this week’s Best Practice of the Week, we’re talking about text alternatives for decorative images.

  2. Writing descriptive alt attributes for images

    Written by on November 22, 2013 in Design, Development

    In this week’s Best Practice of the Week, we’re talking about how to provide descriptive alt attributes for images.

  3. One error message does not fit all

    Written by on November 14, 2013 in Design

    In this week’s Best Practice of the Week, we’re talking about error messages and how they convey problems to users. Error messages should be specific and let the user know what they need to do to fix it.

  4. Displaying multiple errors on a form

    Written by on November 5, 2013 in Design, Development

    In this week’s Best Practice of the Week (BPOW), we show you how to handle displaying multiple errors on a form.

  5. Accessibility tips for people with dyslexia

    Written by on October 28, 2013 in Design, Understanding accessibility

    In this week’s best practice, we discuss the accessibility needs of users with dyslexia. Dyslexia is a learning disability that impacts an individual’s reading fluency and comprehension, affecting 8% of all people worldwide. There are common issues that people with dyslexia struggle with every day when interacting with web content, but we can easily avoid them to provide a more accessible user experience.

  6. Support the ability to resize text

    Written by on October 2, 2013 in Design, Development

    In this week’s Best Practice of the Week (BPOW), we examine the best ways to provide help for users who need to resize the text on your web pages in order to read the content more easily.

  7. Colour contrast by the numbers

    Written by on September 12, 2013 in Design

    In this Best Practice of the Week (BPOW): always provide good color contrast on your web pages, as insufficient contrast can affect several types of users in many different scenarios. Specifically, improving the overall color contrast on your web site or application benefits users with color blindness, users with low vision, and users with mobile devices.

  8. Title attributes

    Written by on September 4, 2013 in Design, Development

    In this week’s BPOW (Best Practice of the Week), we look at the title attribute. Title attributes seem to end up everywhere. And, you really don’t need them because most of the time they’re just creating redundant information. For people with screenreaders, they might hear the title and the text – or just the link text. But, title attributes also have an impact on low vision users who use screen magnification.

  9. Capitalization matters

    Written by on August 8, 2013 in Content, Design

    We look at content in this issue of our Best Practice of the Week (BPOW): It’s easy to forget that a couple of letters share different meanings until you hear them in a screenreader.

  10. Design & development: the yin & yang of web accessibility

    Written by on March 13, 2013 in Design, Development, Understanding accessibility

    Many people focus on just the development aspect of web accessibility. The truth is, a flawed design coded perfectly is just as bad as a brilliant design coded poorly. You need both aspects—design AND development—to truly succeed with accessibility.