1. Accessibility is everyone’s job: a role-based model for teams

    Written by on June 16, 2016 in Business, Content, Design, Development, Testing, Understanding accessibility, UX

    In order for projects to be truly accessible, the whole team needs to collaborate. But, who does what? In this post, Mark helps us unpack how each role can contribute to making something that works for everyone.

  2. Should all content be responsive?

    Written by on May 26, 2016 in Development, Examples

    In this screencast, Derek walks us through a couple of examples where traditional approaches to responsive content may actually hamper people from achieving their goals online. He proposes some alternative approaches that keep user experience top of mind.

  3. Creating bulletproof headings

    Written by on May 12, 2016 in Development

    With some changes to the W3C guidelines on the horizon, Julie walks us through some best practices for headings, one of the web’s most humble-yet-powerful elements.

  4. Real users on Adobe PDFs

    Written by on May 5, 2016 in Development, Examples, UX

    This week, Joanna mines one of our most valuable resources—Simply Accessible’s usability panel—real users who test what we make to ensure our sites and apps are truly accessible. We asked them what barriers they face when accessing PDF documents on the web. Here’s what they had to say.

  5. ARIA thunder: why we published a controversial post (and why we’ll probably do it again)

    Written by on April 22, 2016 in Development, Understanding accessibility

    Our post last week about the pitfalls of ARIA tabs pushed some buttons in the accessibility community. This week, Derek responds to the reactions and shares why we felt it was important to publish something that made our readers uncomfortable.

  6. Danger! ARIA tabs

    Written by on April 14, 2016 in Development, Examples

    ARIA is a great way to make things technically accessible, sometimes without requiring markup changes. But it can be tricky, even if you’re using it in a technically correct way. In this post, Jeff breaks down an ARIA tabs interaction to see how ARIA can impact users with disabilities—and how to make tabs truly accessible.

  7. Keyboard support for mobile: the tutorial

    Written by on March 31, 2016 in Development, UX

    In a tasty follow-up to her article about keyboard accessibility for mobile devices, Devon walks us through a pizza-themed tutorial, bringing keyboard support life in the most delicious way.

  8. Three common accessibility pitfalls for developers: information and relationships

    Written by on March 24, 2016 in Development

    In the third post of her “Accessibility pitfalls for developers” series, Julie takes on information and relationships. This success criteria is about making sure that everyone gets the information, even if they can’t perceive the page the way other people can.

  9. Three common accessibility pitfalls for developers: colour contrast

    Written by on February 18, 2016 in Design, Development

    In the next installment of her “Accessibility pitfalls for developers” series, Julie takes a look at the second most common accessibility problem we see: colour contrast. Colour is most often a designer’s domain, so why a post about colour for developers? Well, the answer is as complex as the projects themselves.

  10. Supporting the keyboard for mobile

    Written by on February 11, 2016 in Development, UX

    Keyboard support means you have the freedom to use your hardware in the way that is most efficient and effective for you, which is really the whole point of inclusive design. But how do we get to keyboard accessibility for touch interfaces?