1. ARIA thunder: why we published a controversial post (and why we’ll probably do it again)

    Written by on April 22, 2016 in Development, Understanding accessibility

    Our post last week about the pitfalls of ARIA tabs pushed some buttons in the accessibility community. This week, Derek responds to the reactions and shares why we felt it was important to publish something that made our readers uncomfortable.

  2. Danger! ARIA tabs

    Written by on April 14, 2016 in Development, Examples

    ARIA is a great way to make things technically accessible, sometimes without requiring markup changes. But it can be tricky, even if you’re using it in a technically correct way. In this post, Jeff breaks down an ARIA tabs interaction to see how ARIA can impact users with disabilities—and how to make tabs truly accessible.

  3. The accessibility stack: making a better layer cake

    Written by on January 21, 2016 in Development, Examples, Understanding accessibility

    One way to prevent avoidable issues is to approach building for accessibility the way you build a web or native app from the ground up, in a stack of technologies, where each one has its role to play. Just like you carefully consider what backend language (if any), framework language, and additional libraries you might want to use for your app before you start building, the same should be done for accessibility.

  4. Single page applications, Angular.js and accessibility
    Single page applications, Angular.js and accessibility

    Written by on March 3, 2015 in Development

    Developers face pretty specific challenges when creating a highly accessible single page application (SPA) user experience. This in-depth tutorial outlines some best practices and accessibility challenges common to SPAs (and specifically Angular apps) so you can build an SPA that works for everyone.

  5. Three types of relationships and what they mean for accessibility

    Written by on August 22, 2014 in Understanding accessibility

    There are 3 types of relationships in a web page: explicit, implicit, and content-based relationships. Read this to see what they are and why they’re critical to ensure accessibility for everyone.

  6. How Dragon Naturally Speaking works with ARIA

    Written by on August 1, 2014 in Development, Understanding accessibility

    The latest and greatest Dragon Naturally Speaking (version 13) finally catches up, at least partially, with a critical web standard: WAI-ARIA.

  7. Molly Holzschlag at AccessU on the open web

    Written by on May 1, 2013 in Understanding accessibility

    Today we talk with Molly Holzschlag about CSS, resolving accessbility tensions in design, ARIA and the culture in Austin as we prepare for Knowbility’s John Slatin AccessU.

  8. Design & development: the yin & yang of web accessibility

    Written by on March 13, 2013 in Design, Development, Understanding accessibility

    Many people focus on just the development aspect of web accessibility. The truth is, a flawed design coded perfectly is just as bad as a brilliant design coded poorly. You need both aspects—design AND development—to truly succeed with accessibility.

  9. Knowing when to break the rules

    Written by on June 27, 2011 in Understanding accessibility

    We have lots of rules to follow in web design and development and we need to know which ones to break and when. Validation is one of the “rules” that I’m giving you permission to break, when you add ARIA to your applications.

  10. Will we ever get required fields right?

    Written by on December 1, 2010 in Development, Top posts

    I see forms all the time that make me wonder if we’ll ever see people noting required fields in a form correctly. I bet you do too. Timing is everything, and yesterday—just as an article of ours was published at A List Apart called ARIA and Progressive Enhancement where we look at required fields in detail—I saw an example of a form that just makes me cringe.