1. Something to hide

    Written by on December 23, 2013 in Development

    In this week’s Best Practice of the Week, we’re talking about various methods for hiding content from users.

  2. Text alternatives for decorative images

    Written by on December 18, 2013 in Design, Development

    In this week’s Best Practice of the Week, we’re talking about text alternatives for decorative images.

  3. Writing descriptive alt attributes for images

    Written by on November 22, 2013 in Design, Development

    In this week’s Best Practice of the Week, we’re talking about how to provide descriptive alt attributes for images.

  4. One error message does not fit all

    Written by on November 14, 2013 in Design

    In this week’s Best Practice of the Week, we’re talking about error messages and how they convey problems to users. Error messages should be specific and let the user know what they need to do to fix it.

  5. Displaying multiple errors on a form

    Written by on November 5, 2013 in Design, Development

    In this week’s Best Practice of the Week (BPOW), we show you how to handle displaying multiple errors on a form.

  6. Including error messages in labels

    Written by on October 16, 2013 in Development

    In this week’s Best Practice of the Week (BPOW), we show you an easy trick for making sure that all users are notified when form data contains errors.

  7. Support the ability to resize text

    Written by on October 2, 2013 in Design, Development

    In this week’s Best Practice of the Week (BPOW), we examine the best ways to provide help for users who need to resize the text on your web pages in order to read the content more easily.

  8. Colour contrast by the numbers

    Written by on September 12, 2013 in Design

    In this Best Practice of the Week (BPOW): always provide good color contrast on your web pages, as insufficient contrast can affect several types of users in many different scenarios. Specifically, improving the overall color contrast on your web site or application benefits users with color blindness, users with low vision, and users with mobile devices.

  9. Title attributes

    Written by on September 4, 2013 in Design, Development

    In this week’s BPOW (Best Practice of the Week), we look at the title attribute. Title attributes seem to end up everywhere. And, you really don’t need them because most of the time they’re just creating redundant information. For people with screenreaders, they might hear the title and the text – or just the link text. But, title attributes also have an impact on low vision users who use screen magnification.

  10. Alt text is for more than just screen readers

    Written by on August 29, 2013 in Development

    Good alt text is seen as critical for people that use screen readers. But it doesn’t stop there. We need to consider the effect of alt text on people that also rely on good, accurate alt text: people that use voice recognition software. Learn more in this instalment of the Best Practice of the Week (BPOW).