1. Accessibility testing: correction scenarios

    Written by on October 6, 2011 in Design, Development

    Accessibility and user experience are not black and white. Here we take a look at some shades of grey, and user scenarios that we need to take into account when we’re testing web sites and applications. We need to test for correct cases, incorrect cases, and moving efficiently from the incorrect state to the correct state.

  2. Will we ever get required fields right?

    Written by on December 1, 2010 in Development, Top posts

    I see forms all the time that make me wonder if we’ll ever see people noting required fields in a form correctly. I bet you do too. Timing is everything, and yesterday—just as an article of ours was published at A List Apart called ARIA and Progressive Enhancement where we look at required fields in detail—I saw an example of a form that just makes me cringe.

  3. Form error messages

    Written by on October 16, 2005 in Design, Development

    Use absolute positioning to visually place error messages after the form control they are associated with while keeping them as part of the form control’s label.

  4. Required form fields

    Written by on October 10, 2005 in Development, Top posts

    Use a separate fieldset for required fields, or denote them with an asterisk that is visually placed to the right of the input control using absolute positioning but is part of the label.

  5. Search results page layout

    Written by on in Design

    Use absolute positioning and a more logical source order to make forms with optional fields more usable to keyboard users and those using screen readers.

  6. Search form layout

    Written by on in Design, Development

    Use absolute positioning and a more logical source order to make forms with optional fields more usable to keyboard users and those using screen readers.