1. Creating accessible React apps

    Written by on October 19, 2017 in Development, Examples

    The React JavaScript library is a great way to create reusable modular components that can be shared among projects. But how do you ensure your React apps are usable by all kinds of people? Scott takes us through a detailed and timely tutorial on creating accessible React apps.

  2. A smartphone accessibility primer; or, how I learned to stop worrying and master mobile accessibility

    Written by on October 4, 2017 in Design, Development, Understanding accessibility, UX

    This is part one of a series of articles that will take you through the basics of mobile accessibility for Android and iPhone, and help you conduct an accessibility assessment on the mobile device of your choice. This week, we’ll start off by comparing TalkBack and VoiceOver screen reader software. Next, we’ll cover the basics of mobile accessibility for fonts and colours, then mobile switch controls, followed by a testing method for mobile for each popular operating system. Welcome aboard, and we hope you enjoy the ride!

  3. Creating accessible forms with Angular

    Written by on May 18, 2017 in Development, Understanding accessibility

    Forms are integral to the online experience, and a well-written form structure ensures the forms you make are easy to use – for everyone. In this post, Scott Vinkle offers solutions discovered by himself and the Simply Accessible team when it comes to creating accessible forms in Angular.

  4. 7 solutions for creating more accessible SVGs

    Written by on March 16, 2017 in Development, Understanding accessibility

    We’ve been working with SVGs a lot recently, which has led our developers down a rabbithole of discovery! Here are some things to consider when it comes to SVGs and accessibility.

  5. How can I do this better?

    Written by on February 14, 2017 in Development, Understanding accessibility

    Nothing makes us happier than knowing there are people out there just as eager as we are when it comes to making the digital world better for everyone.

  6. Listening to the web, part three: working with screen readers

    Written by on November 17, 2016 in Development

    In the previous article, we unveiled the magic behind semantic code and using native elements in designing usable sites. Remembering to keep a mindset of accessibility and inclusivity, we journey onward in the third and final article in this series. Destination: screen readers. You’ll come away with everything you need to know to get your hands dirty when it comes to designing, developing for, and testing your sites with screen readers.

  7. Listening to the web, part two: it’s all semantics

    Written by on November 16, 2016 in Development

    Building upon our accessibility mindset, in this part of Scott Vinkle’s three-part series we journey into the land of accessible code. We cover the basics of writing semantic HTML, and we explore why native HTML elements are so effective in creating highly user-friendly websites.

  8. Listening to the web, part one: thinking in accessibility

    Written by on November 15, 2016 in Design, Development

    Before we can boldly venture into the world of semantic HTML and screen readers, we must establish a solid foundation of thinking in accessibility. In this post, developer Scott Vinkle reminds us of the importance of creating and maintaining a mindset of inclusive thinking.

  9. Accessibility is everyone’s job: a role-based model for teams

    Written by on June 16, 2016 in Business, Content, Design, Development, Testing, Understanding accessibility, UX

    In order for projects to be truly accessible, the whole team needs to collaborate. But, who does what? In this post, Mark helps us unpack how each role can contribute to making something that works for everyone.

  10. Should all content be responsive?

    Written by on May 26, 2016 in Development, Examples

    In this screencast, Derek walks us through a couple of examples where traditional approaches to responsive content may actually hamper people from achieving their goals online. He proposes some alternative approaches that keep user experience top of mind.