1. A smartphone accessibility primer; or, how I learned to stop worrying and master mobile accessibility

    Written by on October 4, 2017 in Design, Development, Understanding accessibility, UX

    This is part one of a series of articles that will take you through the basics of mobile accessibility for Android and iPhone, and help you conduct an accessibility assessment on the mobile device of your choice. This week, we’ll start off by comparing TalkBack and VoiceOver screen reader software. Next, we’ll cover the basics of mobile accessibility for fonts and colours, then mobile switch controls, followed by a testing method for mobile for each popular operating system. Welcome aboard, and we hope you enjoy the ride!

  2. 7 solutions for creating more accessible SVGs

    Written by on March 16, 2017 in Development, Understanding accessibility

    We’ve been working with SVGs a lot recently, which has led our developers down a rabbithole of discovery! Here are some things to consider when it comes to SVGs and accessibility.

  3. Listening to the web, part three: working with screen readers

    Written by on November 17, 2016 in Development

    In the previous article, we unveiled the magic behind semantic code and using native elements in designing usable sites. Remembering to keep a mindset of accessibility and inclusivity, we journey onward in the third and final article in this series. Destination: screen readers. You’ll come away with everything you need to know to get your hands dirty when it comes to designing, developing for, and testing your sites with screen readers.

  4. Automatic infinite scrolling & accessibility

    Written by on May 21, 2014 in Design, Top posts

    Automated infinite scrolling is a popular web design technique even though it creates difficult accessibility problems for keyboard users.

  5. Infographic accessibility: text is text

    Written by on February 4, 2014 in Top posts, Understanding accessibility

    Infographics are growing in popularity, but they are often criticized for the accessibility challenges they create. Here’s an infographic that was very surprising when it comes to accessibility, and we felt it should be celebrated and shared as a positive—a small thing, done well.

  6. Design & development: the yin & yang of web accessibility

    Written by on March 13, 2013 in Design, Development, Understanding accessibility

    Many people focus on just the development aspect of web accessibility. The truth is, a flawed design coded perfectly is just as bad as a brilliant design coded poorly. You need both aspects—design AND development—to truly succeed with accessibility.