1. A smartphone accessibility primer; or, how I learned to stop worrying and master mobile accessibility

    Written by on October 4, 2017 in Design, Development, Understanding accessibility, UX

    This is part one of a series of articles that will take you through the basics of mobile accessibility for Android and iPhone, and help you conduct an accessibility assessment on the mobile device of your choice. This week, we’ll start off by comparing TalkBack and VoiceOver screen reader software. Next, we’ll cover the basics of mobile accessibility for fonts and colours, then mobile switch controls, followed by a testing method for mobile for each popular operating system. Welcome aboard, and we hope you enjoy the ride!

  2. WCAG 2.0: beyond web content

    Written by on November 9, 2010 in Understanding accessibility

    Even though WCAG 2.0 isn’t designed to be used beyond web content, its technology agnostic nature and foundation in user needs means that we can use it as a tool for assessing iPhone/iPad apps, desktop apps and more.

  3. Custom styles for iOS

    Written by on October 1, 2010 in Development

    iOS allows the user to switch to a “high contrast” display—essentially reversing the colour scheme. This doesn’t give the fine control of colours that a desktop operating system provides. With the use of a user style sheet and a slick bookmarklet, a user can apply a custom stylesheet to mobile Safari on their iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch so that they can display the web site or application to suit their own styles.